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The POST era: Post-Coture

PH: Lee Wei Swee

The POST era: Post-Coture

PH: Lee Wei Swee

by Camila Straschnoy

There’s no doubt that the fashion industry is changing. While, for some of us, it may not be changing as quickly as we’d like, there is proof that consumer behavior is shifting, the role of the designer is growing and technology is at the forefront. In spite of the awareness some are trying to preach on FASHION+SUSTAINABILITY, things haven’t changed much. Projects like the one I’m about to introduce are the KEY to change thank to creative minds that work together towards a democratic fashion scene.

Over the past few years, clothing has been treated more and more like a disposable product. The production of clothing is aimed for increasing numbers and production to decrease prices. Low prices seem attractive, but what does this way of producing mean for the future of the environment and the people that work in this industry?
The project I want to introduce is: The Post-Couture Collective. They offer an alternative to today’s fashion system, by introducing to the world a new era in the production of sustainable and affordable clothing. Their clothing is designed on the principles of open-source, and is made using 21st century technology. This makes them the first fashion label that truly embraces the Maker Movement and the Third Industrial Revolution.

[grve_video video_link=”https://vimeo.com/138505271″]
[vc_custom_heading text=”SUSTAINABILITY” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:center” google_fonts=”font_family:Cabin%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C500%2C500italic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic|font_style:500%20bold%20regular%3A500%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1486426207938{background-color: #eaeaea !important;border-radius: 30px !important;}”]

The Post-Coture Collective developed an innovative way of producing clothing in which the end-user gives the garments an added value that mass-produced fashion can never attain. In local production-facilities garments will only be made when they are sold, so left-over stock in stores will be a thing of the past. The materials used for the prodcution of the pieces is already recycled, or can be easily recycled due to the production and assembly process.

To accomplish their vision, they are in the process of building a global network of designers, technical researchers and production locations to continue their project. In collaborations, they had also developed an online collections for production on lasercutters and 3D printers, in order to share the designs  digitally and enable the local on-demand manufacture.

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[vc_custom_heading text=”OTHER WORTH KNOWING PROJECTS” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Cabin%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C500%2C500italic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic|font_style:500%20bold%20regular%3A500%3Anormal” css=”.vc_custom_1486429201936{background-color: #eaeaea !important;border-radius: 35px !important;}”]
[vc_custom_heading text=”#whomademyclothes” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Cabin%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C500%2C500italic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”]

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The FASHION REVOLUTION project claims that fashion can be made in a safe, clean and beautiful way. One in which creativity, quality, environment and people are valued equally.

On 24-30 April 2017, Fashion Revolution Week will bring people from all over the world together to use the power of fashion to change the story for the people who make the world’s clothes and accessories.

Get involved in asking brands #whomademyclothes? when the hashtag returns to social media catwalks in April. Folks from more than 92 countries took part last year, urging labels to improve clothes sourcing and accountability. “We want clothes that we’re proud to wear,” say organizers.

[vc_custom_heading text=”The 30 Year Collection by Tom Cridland” font_container=”tag:h3|text_align:left” google_fonts=”font_family:Cabin%3Aregular%2Citalic%2C500%2C500italic%2C600%2C600italic%2C700%2C700italic|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”]

Tom Cridland is world known sustainable fashion brand,  offering durable, luxury clothing at an affordable price point.

In 2015, Tom launched The 30 Year Sweatshirt, a sustainable fashion project in the form of a luxury cotton crewneck backed up with a 30 Year Guarantee. He continued this momentum by launching The 30 Year T-Shirt immediately afterwards. The 30 Year Jacket was released at the end of February as evidence that menswear can lead the race for sustainable fashion.

 

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Although SUSTAINABILITY has been a trend for a while, POST COTURE is a concept worth knowing about. It’s  aligned with POST-INTERNET concept we already discussed on a previous post. Want to know more? Check out their website become a maker today. Join The Post-Couture Community on Facebook to share your experiences and ideas.